Welcome to FrockTalk, the web’s only costume-based movie review site. The goal of Frocktalk is to shed light on the magnificent artistry of costume design in motion pictures. Reviews on this site are written by working costume designers in the entertainment industry – people who know, better than anyone, what it takes to make it all happen. The focus of FrockTalk is not to comment on the big flashy costume dramas, but to call attention to the seemingly ordinary costume design work in film that silently and persuasively moves the audience toward understanding the characters. Costume design for motion pictures is an art form that deserves more recognition than it usually gets. Fancy, pretty costumes do not always equal effective, appropriate costumes. The art of the costume is in letting the audience know who the character is, before the actor even has a chance to open his mouth. Read on, and enjoy. ** CAUTION: ALL REVIEWS CONTAIN SPOILERS! **

Tag Archive for 'ny times'

Catching up… and Links!

Hey Frocktalkers!! It’s starting to get bananas around here – holiday season is in full swing, and I’ve just started a new job. I’ve been posting cool articles about costumes like crazy on Twitter – follow me @Frocktalk – and I am going to recap some of the highlights here for you now.

Nice article about the design of CLOUD ATLAS

Interesting – Food Network’s new show features costume designers, airing 12-30-12 at 8P/7C – the show is called SUGAR DOME!! I want to see a cake dress!!!  Looks like fun.

LA Times piece about Deborah Nadoolman Landis’ new book about Hollywood Costume Sketches – it’s a beautiful book, BTW!

Beautiful article about Deborah Nadoolman Landis – advocate for costumes!

LA Times article about costumes in the Awards-contending films

Another LA Times article (Go, LAT!) about costumes becoming fashion trends…   (continued after the jump)

Continue reading ‘Catching up… and Links!’

Is This the Sound of the Door Slamming Closed on Your Foot?

Painting by Poucher

Painting by Poucher

Frocktalkers, in this industry, the easiest way to meet people and to make connections while you’re in school is to INTERN.  This usually means working unpaid, for school credit, and doing all kinds of menial jobs while observing the way filmmaking works.  I interned.  Everyone I know interned.  You suck it up and pay your dues for a few weeks or months, and you leave with an address book full of potential job contacts.  Most people don’t complain about this, knowing that it is part of a long-standing system in our culture.  Well, a couple of interns from the acclaimed film Black Swan have now filed a lawsuit against Fox Searchlight claiming that they should have been paid for their time, and that the work they did should have been done by paid employees of Fox… and according to Nikki Finke, they are turning it into a class-action lawsuit, encompassing more than 100 former unpaid Fox Searchlight interns.

To say that this is a bad idea for their future entertainment careers is one thing.  What they might fail to realize is that by bringing this suit to court, they may well be thwarting the growth and development of hundreds of other students, eager for legitimate experience in the industry.  Do you honestly think Fox or any of its affiliates will ever again allow interns?  Not likely – and who could blame them?!  If other studios and production companies follow suit, it could be disastrous for college students wanting some summer experience.  Keep in mind that the people filing the suit took these intern jobs of their own volition – no one forced them to work for free.  They volunteered.  To punish Fox (and by extension, potentially hundreds or thousands of aspiring filmmakers) for a personal decision they now regret is completely convoluted.   They ought to be ashamed of themselves.

What do you think?

UPDATE: Fox Searchlight responds with, “And you are…???”

– KMB

Milking the Cash Cow

Here is a fairly disturbing article from the NY Times for you.  It explains what is happening in our industry in terms of the deals being made for product placement.  Product placement is the process of using goods, brands, logos or identifiable products in a film in exchange for some kind of compensation (like free products or services, or a lump-sum of cash).    On one hand, product placement can be very helpful on a small film.  You don’t have the money to buy everything you need (let’s say, to outfit a football team), so you hook up with an athletic-gear company and they donate everything you need… in exchange for their logo being seen prominently in frame on the actors.  That’s fair.

What’s NOT fair (to anyone with even a speck of artistic integrity) is hiring a lawyer to rewrite a script in order to facilitate these deals.  I’ll be honest, this article made me want to barf – in solidarity with every writer, director and creative department head I have ever known.  It’s sad, kids.

READ THE ARTICLE HERE

— KMB

Alice in Wonderland-Mania!

From the NY Times, I give you this article about how Tim Burton’s new film Alice In Wonderland is inspiring fashion, art, and all of humanity. It’s a nice piece, and they talk with Colleen Atwood about her work.  Read on!

ARTICLE HERE

— KMB



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